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Source: (consider it) Thread: Sailorlets thread
Dafyd
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# 5549

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I can't see a baby and toddler thread open so I'm starting up this one.

Opening topic:
The Dafling has been beginning to eat meals with us. She is still a bit short on teeth so she's not really up to meat other than sausage meat and mince. Do people have ideas for things that can be eaten without boredom by the whole family please?

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we remain, thanks to original sin, much in love with talking about, rather than with, one another. Rowan Williams

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Lucia

Looking for light
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When ours were small they generally had whatever we were having but pureed in an electric blender, initially finely to baby food consistency (a little water added to get this) and as they grew older blended for less time to get a coarser chopped effect. An advantage of this is they get used to eating lots of different flavours and are more likely to grow up with a wider palette.
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Dafyd
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# 5549

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quote:
Originally posted by Lucia:
When ours were small they generally had whatever we were having but pureed in an electric blender, initially finely to baby food consistency (a little water added to get this) and as they grew older blended for less time to get a coarser chopped effect. An advantage of this is they get used to eating lots of different flavours and are more likely to grow up with a wider palette.

She's getting a bit past the stage where she needs non-meat blended. And what we'd like is for her to be able to eat exactly what we're eating. It's less faff for us cooking, and she knows that the stuff on her plate is the same as the stuff on Mum's plate. (Tthe stuff on Mum's plate is more interesting than the stuff on her plate even when they're exactly the same.)
What I'm looking for is recipe suggestions that work for adults and small children at the same time. At the moment, we have sausage, pasta bolognese, cottage pie, and macaroni cheese. I'd like to widen the variety a bit.

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we remain, thanks to original sin, much in love with talking about, rather than with, one another. Rowan Williams

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Jengie jon

Semper Reformanda
# 273

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quote:
Originally posted by Dafyd:
It's less faff for us cooking, and she knows that the stuff on her plate is the same as the stuff on Mum's plate. (Tthe stuff on Mum's plate is more interesting than the stuff on her plate even when they're exactly the same.)

Sorry to dampen your expectations but my niece never bought that story. She was always sure that the food on her older brothers plate was better than hers. In the end my sister used to give my nephew a side helping for his sister.

Jengie

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Sarkycow
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We just chopped up meat really really tiny for calf 1. Or cut it into long fingers, so she could suck it and gum it to death. Baby-led weaning is the way forward if you want low-faff meals [Smile]

Calf 2 is just starting with vegetable and fruit fingers, which get enthusiastically waved at us before being sucked until they disappear.

Sarky

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Qoheleth.

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quote:
Originally posted by Sarkycow:
[...]
Sarky

Welcome back!

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Offeiriad

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Our son at that age was very fond of curry and rice. (Won't touch it now!)
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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
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quote:
Originally posted by Oferyas:
Our son at that age was very fond of curry and rice. (Won't touch it now!)

I am so sorry for him.

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Sarkycow
La belle Dame sans merci
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Calf 1 likes curry and rice, but separately (she's at the age when everything has to be separate rather than mixed together). And she loves the bread, jam and crisps you have with it [Big Grin]

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“Just because your voice reaches halfway around the world doesn't mean you are wiser than when it reached only to the end of the bar.”

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Keren-Happuch

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Both KGlets ate all kinds of things at that age that they won't touch now (although KGlet1 is getting much better at trying things again). Once the power of "no!" kicks in...

Still, fish pie, and fish in general, is good. You can make a bolognaise type thing with tuna instead of mince. A baked bean minestrone pot thing worked well at that age. Can post recipes in Heaven to save annoying the AS hosts.

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Nea Fox

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Dafyd
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quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
Still, fish pie, and fish in general, is good. You can make a bolognaise type thing with tuna instead of mince. A baked bean minestrone pot thing worked well at that age. Can post recipes in Heaven to save annoying the AS hosts.

Recipes in Heaven would be good. Thank you.

[ 06. May 2013, 18:40: Message edited by: Dafyd ]

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we remain, thanks to original sin, much in love with talking about, rather than with, one another. Rowan Williams

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kingsfold

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I was also going to suggest fish dishes.

You could also try vegetarian versions of bolognese, shepherds pie etc using lentils which have some texture. Or veggie dishes including chickpeas. I'm assuming that you're feeding her, from your description?

Ariel posted a link some while back to a pumpkin sausage & Sage casserole which is pretty good. Yes, it's still sausage, but there are also beans and squash (I use butternut squash out of pumpkin time) in there, and a different flavour combination from bolognese based stuff, which would give you & Mrs Dafyd a change.


[disclaimer] I am not a parent, and I have a sum total of zero experience with feeding babies/toddlers!.

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Viola
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Heck - yes - fish!

Our toddler polished off an enormous plate of salmon (coated in saffron couscous - thanks Delia & Waitrose recipe cards) this evening, and will generally eat mountains of nicely cooked, flaky fish. If ours is in a spicy sauce, his will be in a milder version of the same - obviously it MUST look exactly the same as whatever's on my plate.

Unless there is rhubarb crumble on my plate. That was hilarious - but not for the toddler.

Meat works if it's either cut up very small, or very thoroughly stewed so that it will fall apart easily. Think casseroles or pulled pork or suchlike.

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Keren-Happuch

Ship's Eyeshadow
# 9818

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quote:
Originally posted by Dafyd:
quote:
Originally posted by Keren-Happuch:
Still, fish pie, and fish in general, is good. You can make a bolognaise type thing with tuna instead of mince. A baked bean minestrone pot thing worked well at that age. Can post recipes in Heaven to save annoying the AS hosts.

Recipes in Heaven would be good. Thank you.
Done.

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Nea Fox

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Surfing Madness
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quote:
Originally posted by Viola:


Unless there is rhubarb crumble on my plate. That was hilarious - but not for the toddler.


Sounds interesting, I'd love to know what happened....unless it was [Projectile]

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Ferijen
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Great to see you Sarky!

Little ferijen (nearly 1) Doesn't Do Pasta, much to his mother's disdain. Unless its so tiny its invisible (think, tiny pasta in a soup). However, rice is good - my 'special fried rice', risotto and paella are all easy wins and work for him and us.

Fish pie is great, fish fingers, less so. I find that depending on how horrid the teeth are feeling depends on what goes down.

A very quick and easy one is a single egg omelette, with veg very small in it (veg is hit and miss, having been very much hits a few months ago). Folded over, a bit of cheese in the middle, and either cut into fingers for self feeding, or fed on a fork when he's feeling more, er, picklish.

The first time he had pizza - with two teeth - was a revelation. He looked at us 'so *this* is what its all about?'.

He had his first ice cream yesterday. A shop near us does toddler cones. Proud mum moment.

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Viola
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quote:
Originally posted by Surfing Madness:
quote:
Originally posted by Viola:


Unless there is rhubarb crumble on my plate. That was hilarious - but not for the toddler.


Sounds interesting, I'd love to know what happened....unless it was [Projectile]
Well, you know that face an adult will make when given a lemon to suck..? That, for the first taste, then a very slow headshake and a sad 'Doh Mumma' ('doh' being toddler for 'no' in our house) when offered another spoonful, with a much higher custard to rhubarb ratio. Then later at night, when I checked on him in bed, there was a teeny tiny bit of spewed up rhubarb on his sheet.

Poor, abused child.

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"If ye love me, keep my commandments" John 14:15

"Commandment number one: shut the hell up." Erin Etheredge 1971-2010

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L'organist
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# 17338

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Dafyd

Try risotto: if you use a basic recipe for, say, mushroom risotto you can spoon out a helping for the tiny before adding either shredded chicken or prawns for the bigger people.

Spaghetti (or other pasta) al forno is another useful standby if made using a bland-ish sauce and then the rest of you can have grilled meat or whatever to go with it.

Salad is also good at this age - softish, lots of nice textures for the little to explore - if its too cold add some new potato wedges or similar.

As for meat and lack of teeth - we used to make our own burgers and just put a small amount of the mixture into the blender so it became a paste: form into a burger and the little eats exactly the same.

Bon appetit

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the famous rachel
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We would also recommend risotto (the famous toddler is not longer keen, but used to love mushroom and butternut squash risotto), or for an alternative you could use orzo (also called risoni) and make a risoniotto. (This one would not suit the famous toddler, who has gone off mushrooms. We make one with salmon, spinach and peas which he likes). I would second the suggestion of a mild curry - the famous toddler likes chicken korma, with butternut squash and apricots, based on an Annabel Karmel recipe. In terms of meat, meatballs are a good one. Again, we use an Annabel Karmel recipe for beef and apple meatballs, and serve them with pasta and a "tomato and hidden vegetable sauce" (essentially a basic tomato sauce with lots of finely chopped carrot, celery and onion).

We are just starting potty training. Does anyone have any tips?

All the best,

Rachel.

[ 08. May 2013, 13:00: Message edited by: the famous rachel ]

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no prophet's flag is set so...

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Noodles of all kinds. Usually eaten with fingers, and hold the sauce for little person, usually also. At most grated cheese with it. Peas and beans are also good, one at a time with fingers.

I recall it all being rather messy. Regardless of what it is.

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L'organist
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quote:
posted by the famous rachel
We are just starting potty training. Does anyone have any tips?

1. If your child is very small make sure they actually make pants small enough to fit - we had two able to use a potty but couldn't find underpants...

2. Only try to potty-train in the summer.

3. Use the "total immersion" method.
  • a week or so about being a "big" boy or girl now
  • take them with you to buy the underpants and let them choose
  • for 1 child you'll need around 12 pairs of pants
  • mark it as a "special" day at breakfast, then nappies away!
  • with summer weather make all play outdoor or around area near downstairs loo - washable floors, see!
  • let them play in just underpants and T-shirt - its a big ask to expect them to cope with trousers or skirts as well
  • HUGE praise as and when they go on the potty or ask for the loo
  • NO BIG DEAL if they wet themselves
  • after about 2 weeks you should have a dry toddler during the daytime [Smile]

Getting them dry at night:
  • before discarding the overnight nappy ask if they can try going through the night without "having" to wet it; don't attempt commando night times until you've had 4 dry nights in seven
  • wait at least 6-8 weeks before attempting dry night times
  • during these 6-8 weeks alter the night time routine so that last drink is taken earlier
  • make tooth brushing then loo the last two actiivities before bed
  • when you put to bed remind them that if they wake up NEEDING TO PEE they can call you (reinstate baby alarm for this purpose)
Most important thing is to make sure they don't feel they've made you cross or angry if they have an accident. To help with this, beg/borrow/buy from charity shop old towels and make triple thickness strips to go across the bed - only the worst wet will penetrate right through.

If you work during the day but are taking a 2 week holiday, then build it up that WHEN YOU GO ON HOLIDAY they won't need nappies and go for it that way. Try to fit in overnight routine around a similar period when it won't be so important if you're faced with a wet bed.

Above all remember that all children are different so try to be as relaxed about it as possible.

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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Leorning Cniht
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# 17564

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quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:

To help with this, beg/borrow/buy from charity shop old towels and make triple thickness strips to go across the bed - only the worst wet will penetrate right through.

Old shower curtains. Specifically, make the bed, lay down an old shower curtain, then make the bed again. You can do several layers like this if you like. When you get a mid-night accident, just remove the top sheet and shower curtain, and the bed is ready again.

"Strips" across the bed wouldn't have worked with the Cnihtlets - they all seem to dance in their sleep, so the business end migrates freely around the bed.

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Nenya
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quote:
Originally posted by the famous rachel:

We are just starting potty training. Does anyone have any tips?

Be as relaxed about it as possible and remember that every child is different. Nenlet2 was over 3 before he got it and one friend said to me she was sure once he did it he'd do days and nights simultaneously. Sure enough, she was right! The trick seemed to be to get Mr Nen to take him to the toilet and demonstrate - there must have been some sense of "You haven't got one of these, how would you know how they work?" [Biased]

Nenlet1 did day times very tidily at a much earlier age, she was just ready to do it earlier.

And I suspect your mum was a more enlightened generation but you don't always have to take on board what parents say. My mum always insisted I was clean and dry at a year. [Roll Eyes]

Nen - who must have spent the first year of life with a potty strapped to her backside.

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L'organist
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Nenya

There is a reason why children born in the 50s and 60s were dry earlier - terry nappies.

Wet terry nappies = nappy rash, guaranteed.

And would YOU want to wander about with great swathes of soaking wet towelling around your nether regions? Me neither.

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Rara temporum felicitate ubi sentire quae velis et quae sentias dicere licet

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Nenya
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quote:
Originally posted by L'organist:
Nenya

There is a reason why children born in the 50s and 60s were dry earlier - terry nappies.

Wet terry nappies = nappy rash, guaranteed.

And would YOU want to wander about with great swathes of soaking wet towelling around your nether regions? Me neither.

I completely agree. I started Nenlet1 with terry nappies (my mum having done the usual "mum" thing in those days and bought me two dozen when the baby was on the way [Roll Eyes] ) and she got nappy rash that wouldn't clear up. It was the doctor who advised me to start using disposables - which wouldn't happen now as terries these days are a lot more user-friendly.

I still maintain I wasn't properly toilet trained, just made to sit on the potty at very regular intervals. In fact I can still remember it - straining to "go" in order to please my mum. [Roll Eyes]

Nen - TMI.

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the famous rachel
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quote:
Originally posted by Nenya:
Be as relaxed about it as possible and remember that every child is different. Nenlet2 was over 3 before he got it and one friend said to me she was sure once he did it he'd do days and nights simultaneously. Sure enough, she was right! The trick seemed to be to get Mr Nen to take him to the toilet and demonstrate - there must have been some sense of "You haven't got one of these, how would you know how they work?" [Biased]

The famous toddler is nearly 2 and a half. I hadn't really intended to start this quite yet (although I had bought a potty), but one evening whilst he was pottering round the bathroom with no clothes on while I was getting his bath ready, he announced "I do wee in potty!", and sat down, and did just that. He did the same the next evening, so I felt this was too good an opportunity to pass up. The trouble is that he is prone to sloppy poos, which will make a hell of a mess when he goes into pants, and I suspect he has little or no control over them. He's keen to go into pants, but I don't want to end up having to force him back into nappies because the poo situation is unbearable! I am thus considering either disposable or washable training pants, but am not sure this is a good idea either - particularly the disposable ones which just strike me as more expensive nappies!

Thanks for all the thoughts so far.

Best wishes,

Rachel.

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A shrivelled appendix to the body of Christ.

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Uncle Pete

Loyaute me lie
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If he does sloppy poos, it might be worth checking him for lactose intolerance or any food intolerance. Gluten springs to mind.

I can vouch for lactose intolerance causing sloppy poos. The others are worth a look at.

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Martha
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Working on potty training with my 2 1/2 year old right now too. We did a little while having him in pants at home and nappies out, but that got too confusing so just went cold turkey after Easter and he did pretty well. He is dry during daytime and naps, and was doing OK at night, but then wet the bed 7 nights in a row so we've put him back in washable nappies overnight. I agree about the disposable training pants - they seem a right rip-off and a lot of waste.

He also does quite sloppy poos, which I just assumed was due to his age. Am I wrong? Because we used cloth nappies, we had some flushable liners to put in them, so we just put them in his pants now, and that helps with clean up. He still won't poo on the potty and gets quite anxious when he needs to go, but most advice I've read says, "patience" so I'm hoping it works out.

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Heavenly Anarchist
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Some children just do have sloppy poos, especially those of a more nervous disposition (my eldest).
I used to make and sell cloth nappies, my brand name was puddlepants [Smile] alas, my site is no longer active as I just don't have time these days.

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the famous rachel
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# 1258

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Thanks all. We are actually in the process of discussing food intolerances with the GP, but currently the issue doesn't look like a classic food intolerance. He has fairly solid poos for a couple of weeks and then suddenly they go massive and sloppy, with no change to his diet and no unusual foods. They then go back to normal for no apparent reason. I'm wondering if stress is involved, although I can't spot specific stress triggers either.

Anyway, I am considering some form of cloth training pants. Does anyone have any experience of these. I found some really clever looking ones on the web, with variable thickness liners, but they seemed to be more than £15 each (!) so I won't be buying them!

Best wishes,

Rachel.

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A shrivelled appendix to the body of Christ.

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Jane R
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Rachel:
quote:
He's keen to go into pants, but I don't want to end up having to force him back into nappies because the poo situation is unbearable!
Don't panic if you do have to do this, and try not to make a big deal out of it. We had to put The Girl back in nappies because we tried to do potty training before she was really ready (due to pressure from the nursery, which in retrospect we should have ignored, but pobody's nerfect). Six months later we tried again and sailed through the potty training with no problems. Well, none that I can remember now, anyway.

I wish I'd had L'organist to advise me when we were going through the potty training stage, but all of them do learn eventually. Keep repeating to yourself 'This too shall pass' as you are mopping up the Little Accidents.

You may find you're worrying unnecessarily; I don't know whether they have more control over poo or whether they're just more aware of when it's coming, but children being toilet-trained seem to have far more accidents with wee.

[ 16. May 2013, 11:01: Message edited by: Jane R ]

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Heavenly Anarchist
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quote:
Originally posted by the famous rachel:

Anyway, I am considering some form of cloth training pants. Does anyone have any experience of these. I found some really clever looking ones on the web, with variable thickness liners, but they seemed to be more than £15 each (!) so I won't be buying them!

Minki nappies does a nappy that can be pulled up called a yoyo but these are still pricy at £13 (they are handmade by a mum in the Hebrides). She's been around for a few years and makes nappies for older children too.
Tbh I found standard training pants sold in Boots, Mothercare etc useless as they don't hold anything as they have little absorbency. But if it is just poos you are worried about they may be okay.

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Antisocial Alto
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quote:
Originally posted by the famous rachel:

Anyway, I am considering some form of cloth training pants. Does anyone have any experience of these. I found some really clever looking ones on the web, with variable thickness liners, but they seemed to be more than £15 each (!) so I won't be buying them!

We potty trained by going cold turkey with underpants during the day- I read somewhere that using pull-ups or other absorbent training pants just confuses the child because they feel too much like a diaper.

It worked quite well for daytimes, only took about four days for him to catch on, but a year and a half later he's still not dry at night! I understand boys do often take longer though.

We did use extra-absorbent underpants like
these. They are just like regular underpants only about 3x thicker down the middle. Thin enough so the child definitely feels it if they have an all-out accident, but thick enough to soak up a little drippage. Plus they are cheap. [Cool]

Dafyd, we had a book called Whole Foods for Babies and Toddlers from La Leche League- it has a bunch of recipes for the whole family, with options to make them simpler for younger babies. When I searched the title on Amazon several similar cookbooks came up as well. Hope this helps.

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L'organist
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quote:
posted by Jane R
I wish I'd had L'organist to advise me when we were going through the potty training stage...

Gosh, thanks. We just muddled through really, and having a pair does have the added bonus of competition between the two.

The only other hint I can give: don't leave grapes lying around - mine got through nearly a kilo between them one morning and the rest of the day was spent practically chained to the loo [Eek!]

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the famous rachel
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Brief update from our end:

The famous toddler is now wearing basic Mothercare training pants, and is getting on pretty well. He's having very few wee-related accidents but is struggling a lot more with poo. We are using a sticker chart to motivate him, with little presents when he fills in a row of stickers. It hasn't been anywhere near as difficult as I anticipated so far, although success is reliant on an awful lot of reminders from adults that he should use the potty. Now I am wondering two things:

1. How do I get him to be more independent, so that I don't have to keep reminding/nagging.

2. How do we ever stop giving him stickers/rewards, having started?

Any thoughts would be appreciated!

Best wishes,

Rachel.

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Jane R
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This probably won't be helpful, Rachel, but the only answer I can think of to both your questions is 'it just happens'; suddenly they get to the point where they go to the toilet without being nagged because that's what big girls (or boys) do, not because they're expecting a sticker or little treats. We filled pages and pages of sticker charts and went through a phase of having to remind her regularly to go to the toilet and then suddenly she seemed to get it. I think with the stickers we just finished off the last packet and then didn't bother buying any more.

She still likes getting stickers at school, but we don't hand them out at home now. Saying thank you and giving her extra hugs when she does stuff like tidying her room without being asked seems to work just as well (she's nine).

When you're going through a developmental stage it seems like it's going to last forever, but suddenly they move on to the next phase and after a while it's difficult to remember what the previous one was like.

YMMV, of course; some children are more motivated by getting tangible rewards like stickers. Ours seems to be content with expressions of parental approval and the occasional small treat like a new book when she does something really outstanding.

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Zacchaeus
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It's also worth remembering that they don't have the growing awareness of needing a wee that adults do.
When they are young (and it can go on even until they are at school) they suddenly realise that they have to go NOW, and that is quite normal.

So if they say one minute that they don't need to go and 5 minutes later have an accident, they were not necessarily being difficult or ignoring it.

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Welease Woderwick

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quote:
Originally posted by Zacchaeus:
...
When they are young (and it can go on even until they are at school) they suddenly realise that they have to go NOW, and that is quite normal...

I'm 64 and have the same problem!

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quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
quote:
Originally posted by Zacchaeus:
...
When they are young (and it can go on even until they are at school) they suddenly realise that they have to go NOW, and that is quite normal...

I'm 64 and have the same problem!
now that I am afraid WW is worthy of a thread all of it's own... [Big Grin]
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Uncle Pete

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quote:
Originally posted by Welease Woderwick:
quote:
Originally posted by Zacchaeus:
...
When they are young (and it can go on even until they are at school) they suddenly realise that they have to go NOW, and that is quite normal...

I'm 64 and have the same problem!
I'd say something but you would probably just laugh and point fingers. Meany.

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the famous rachel
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Thanks all - that's very helpful.

I have no problem with continuing to give stickers until he naturally grow out of them, although the small presents may have to get gradually less frequent. It's very helpful to know that he will (hopefully) grow out of them eventually, without having to make an issue of it.

I wasn't aware that the sensation of needing to pee comes over them quite so suddenly, so that's useful to know.

Best wishes,

Rachel.

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Martha
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We did small pieces of chocolate for going on the potty for a while (since we had several Easter eggs to use up anyway!) and for a while he would ask for it every time, but a few months later he hardly ever mentions it.

We still haven't solved the poo issue though. He always hides away to go in his pants (in another room or under the table) but won't go to the bathroom, never mind go in his potty. Any advice welcomed.

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Jenn.
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We are also having potty issues. As in, he really doesn't want to go on the potty or toilet, but we really need him trained (please trust me that this isn't just selfish parenting). We know he has the control (last time we tried it he didn't wee for 7 hours then hid in the corner to go), he just doesn't want to use anything other than a nappy.

Any bright ideas? We're planning a chocolate incentive for just sitting on the potty at the moment....

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Curiosity killed ...

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A friend managed to potty train her boy by getting him to wee in a bottle (plastic) rather than a pot. Or standing up to wee in the toilet like his father? Doesn't solve pooing, but might help get one under control

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the famous rachel
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We, after initial success, hit total resistance, and so we have put him back in nappies and stopped for a bit. It's going to have to be done sometime though. Ag.

Rachel.

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Chorister

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Be reassured that even the most reluctant ones get there eventually.

An amazing friend of mine started the process at age 6 months, saved her a fortune in nappies. I've not heard of anyone else doing it THAT early though!

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Leorning Cniht
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quote:
Originally posted by the famous rachel:
We, after initial success, hit total resistance, and so we have put him back in nappies and stopped for a bit. It's going to have to be done sometime though.

I like doing it in the summer, because the child can basically spend the summer naked. Not having to deal with clothing can make all the difference between a successful dash to the loo / potty and wet pants and a puddle.
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Chorister

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Be prepared for a setback if you make any major life-changes. This is quite normal. I remember smugly thinking I had it all sorted - then we moved house.

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John Holding

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I'd think a boy would be highly motivated to pee in a toilet (rather than a potty) standing up by seeing his father/older borther/slightly older friend doing it first. Trying to make a boy like peeing in a potty is not so good, as I recall from when my own son was finally getting it all together -- and rather later than we wanted. Learning to aim is a lot easier if you're on a step-stool and facing a toilet.

John

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Nothing wrong with a bag of jelly-babies or whatever for rewards. Buy them specially, even let him choose which kind of sweets, put them visible on a high shelf, and say how much you can't wait for them to come down. Be sure to keep a few with you for when you're out of the house.
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