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Source: (consider it) Thread: Heaven: What's strange about the British?
Eigon
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# 4917

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I remember it happening somewhere in the Pennines (between Lancashire and Yorkshire) but it may be done in other places too.
Not Norfolk, probably (very flat, Norfolk).

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ken
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# 2460

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quote:
Originally posted by Moo:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Eigon:
[qb]Can you tell me where in England they roll Easter eggs?

I've seen it done in Preston, Lancashire.


After a while some of the older kids decided to throw them.

Then one of the adults present - a policeman - got out a bat (baseball? Cricket? I can't remember) and decided to bat them away. Very messily.


This is the only time I have ever witnessed a church outing throwing eggs at a policeman.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Lyda*Rose

Ship's broken porthole
# 4544

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The policeman batting away- what? The older kids? [Biased]

edit ps- They have an Easter egg roll at the White House most years. [Smile]

[ 12. July 2004, 14:19: Message edited by: LydaRose ]

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Crotalus
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quote:
One day Lowder found the choirboys of St. Barnabas filling their pockets with stones and preparing to bombard a sandwichman who carried a Protestant sandwich board. "You must not hurt that unhappy man," said Charles, "it would be very wrong; it would not, however, be wrong to obscure the words he is carrying. Throw the stones away, and there is sixpence to buy rotten eggs with." Now, it was the year of the Great Exhibition, and Prince Albert had brought in the reign of plenty. Rotten eggs were very, very cheap that year, and you could get a lovely lot for sixpence. Consequently, the sandwich-board was successfully veiled in greenish yellow, and the Protestant Party complained to the Bishop. The Bishop was secretly rather amused and in private talked of Lowder's "ovation," but publicly he was very indignant and suspended Lowder for six weeks.
This is unattributed here, but it's from a sermon by H.F.B. Mackay.
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Alicïa
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# 7668

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and dont even start the one about how football was invented

[Biased]

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Ariel
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# 58

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Football was invented by the Romans.

Or so I was told. (Which if true, would make Lazio one of the oldest teams on record.)

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geroff
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Phew
Its taken me a week to read through this thread.(I only get the odd 10minutes around lunchtime).

I think what makes the British Strange is village customs [Eek!] . Abbots Bromley is pretty strange anyway. (See the purgatory thread on ghosts.)

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"The first principle in science is to invent something nice to look at and then decide what it can do." Rowland Emett 1906-1990

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ken
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# 2460

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What's really strange about the British is that we eat more carrots and watercress per head (per stomach?) than any other country in the world.

And we eat less beef per head (much less) than just about any other rich western country. And have a higher proportion of vegetarians in the population.

And a higher proportion of our population live abroad than of any other populous rich country (though to say that we have to define Ireland and New Zealand as "not populous" as even more of them leave home. Though culturally those places are next cousins to the Brits, so there must be something about us that makes us go far, far away Actually the "something" is probably just being islands.)

And we have a (much) lower murder rate than any othe large country, except Japan. But we get involved in more foreign wars than anyone else & have done so consistently for 3 centuries.

I sort of hope that these facts aren't connected - do we export our steak-guzzling murderers and retain the peaceful vegetarians?

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Campbellite

Ut unum sint
# 1202

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quote:
Originally posted by ken:
I sort of hope that these facts aren't connected - do we export our steak-guzzling murderers and retain the peaceful vegetarians?

So what does this say about us Americans, most of whom descend from immigrants from the British Isles?
Maybe this explains the Second Amendment.

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Suffering for Jesus since 1966.
WTFWED?

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geroff
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lets get this thread going again.....

Back to the food bits of this thread, which are so far back I can't be bothered to find them!!

It was the debate about the best places to get sandwiches etc. Try and find an independent shop which (in Derby and Leicester) sell cobs. But this gets into another great British controversy - is it a cob, a roll, or a bap. this indeed could occupy a complete thread of its own.

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"The first principle in science is to invent something nice to look at and then decide what it can do." Rowland Emett 1906-1990

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Karl: Liberal Backslider
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# 76

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It's none of those. It's a breadcake.

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chukovsky

Ship's toddler
# 116

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quote:
Originally posted by MrPiccolo:
its interesting to note that all the "defenders of Lancashire" [Overused] on this thread" :
are now living elsewhere than their place of birth [Biased]

Let me just find The Spouse™. Born in Lancashire and lived in the same town all his life, until he married me, when he moved back to Lancashire.

He does prefer Wensleydale to Lancashire cheese, though claims he liked it before Wallace and Grommit.

Wars of the Roses? Alive and well.

ETA: and he'd be able to tell you it's called a bun, or a schnozzle, or something like that. Bap. Bap. Bap. Repeat after me.

[ 14. July 2004, 12:51: Message edited by: chukovsky ]

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ken
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quote:
Originally posted by geroff:
But this gets into another great British controversy - is it a cob, a roll, or a bap. this indeed could occupy a complete thread of its own.

No it couldn't. The situation is quite clear.

Rolls are a general term for small round bread thingies, too small to call a loaf.

Cobs are bigger - loaf size. By defintion.

A bap is a largish flattish roll. But smaller than a loaf.

A stotty cake is an even larger large flattish bread - large enough that you could call it either a large roll or a small loaf.

Simple.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Alaric the Goth
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Posted by ken:
quote:
A stotty cake is an even larger large flattish bread - large enough that you could call it either a large roll or a small loaf.

Aye, stotties! At least that's the reet name for them in Newcassel and Sun'land. The queeor folks doon in Lancashire caall them 'barm cakes', Ah believe.

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Lunatics and monsters underneath my bed' ('Totem', Rush)

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Eigon
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# 4917

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"Barm cakes" is, of course, the correct term - and they should be made with brewer's yeast, not bread yeast.

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MrPiccolo

Ship's Yorkie Bar
# 7103

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quote:
Originally posted by Alaric the Goth:
Posted by ken:
quote:
A stotty cake is an even larger large flattish bread - large enough that you could call it either a large roll or a small loaf.

Aye, stotties! At least that's the reet name for them in Newcassel and Sun'land. The queeor folks doon in Lancashire caall them 'barm cakes', Ah believe.
Now you see lads, you're both wrong! [Biased]

A large flattish bread thingy is called a "new-cake" according to mi mam!; (And if you want to argue with her; i'll send her around to see ya with 'er clogs on.. [Eek!] [Snigger] [Help] )

[ 14. July 2004, 14:21: Message edited by: MrPiccolo ]

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Gremlin
Ship's Cryptanalyst
# 129

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quote:
Originally posted by ken:
And we eat less beef per head (much less) than just about any other rich western country. And have a higher proportion of vegetarians in the population.

Isn't that just a little ironic given the French nickname for the British, Le Rost Bif (with apologies to any French speakers who know the correct spelling!)

Gremlin

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Ahhh...I see the screw-up fairy has visited us again...
Oh I get it... like humour... but different.

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Cartmel Veteran
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# 7049

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Here in south Manchester I've always known a cob as a large loaf. Bap as a small roll. Barm cake as a flattish roll.

All of which can be used to make a chip buttie.

[ 14. July 2004, 22:23: Message edited by: Inspector Hovis ]

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Amorya

Ship's tame galoot
# 2652

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quote:
Originally posted by ken:
quote:
Originally posted by geroff:
But this gets into another great British controversy - is it a cob, a roll, or a bap. this indeed could occupy a complete thread of its own.

No it couldn't. The situation is quite clear.

Rolls are a general term for small round bread thingies, too small to call a loaf.

Cobs are bigger - loaf size. By defintion.

A bap is a largish flattish roll. But smaller than a loaf.

A stotty cake is an even larger large flattish bread - large enough that you could call it either a large roll or a small loaf.

Simple.

Y'what? A cob isn't loaf sized! When I go to buy a "filled cob" I expect a sandwhich, not a whole bloody picnic! [Biased]

(When I moved to Coventry to go to uni, I discovered these crazy southerners tend to call it a barm-cake. Confused the life out of me.)


Amorya

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Ariel
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# 58

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quote:
Originally posted by Amorya:
(When I moved to Coventry to go to uni, I discovered these crazy southerners tend to call it a barm-cake. Confused the life out of me.)

It would confuse the life out of me too. I never heard the word "barm-cake" before I came on these boards. Nor have I ever seen anything labelled as such in a shop. I'd imagine Coventry is probably as far south as it gets. I never heard of stotty cakes before reading this thread, either.

As far as I'm concerned I would understand a "barm-cake" to be a way of referring to barm brack, which is an Irish fruit bread akin to the Welsh bara brith.

In my part of the world you can buy rolls, or baps, which are larger. And many variations on a theme.

[ 15. July 2004, 02:13: Message edited by: Ariel ]

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RuthW

liberal "peace first" hankie squeezer
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Sounds to me like you're all barmy. [Biased]
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Lyda*Rose

Ship's broken porthole
# 4544

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Remind me never to try to order a sandwich in the UK. [Eek!]

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"Dear God, whose name I do not know - thank you for my life. I forgot how BIG... thank you. Thank you for my life." ~from Joe Vs the Volcano

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Ariel
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# 58

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quote:
Originally posted by RuthW:
Sounds to me like you're all barmy. [Biased]

As they say, you are what you eat.
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chukovsky

Ship's toddler
# 116

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I grew up in Warwickshire and went to school in Coven-tray and never, ever heard "barm-cake", Amorya. It is some of those North Warks/Derbyshire types pulling your leg I think. It is a bap or a roll.

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Ferijen
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# 4719

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quote:
Originally posted by LydaRose:
Remind me never to try to order a sandwich in the UK. [Eek!]

Would that be a butty or a sarnie?
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Ferijen
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# 4719

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quote:
Originally posted by Alaric the Goth:
Posted by ken:
quote:
A stotty cake is an even larger large flattish bread - large enough that you could call it either a large roll or a small loaf.

Aye, stotties! At least that's the reet name for them in Newcassel and Sun'land. The queeor folks doon in Lancashire caall them 'barm cakes', Ah believe.
Barm cakes don't taste like stotties though... I've only seen bread like stotties in the north east. And yummy they are too.
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Schroedinger's cat

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# 64

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I've never heard of a barm-cake or Stotty either. And I agree with Amorya that cob is roll-sized ( although possibly large roll sized ). Not loaf sized.

Baps would generally besmaller, but still sandwich sized. However the terms could be interchanged.

A roll would usually be smaller still, more a nibble than a sandwich.

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take out this broken heart and renew my mind.

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Ariel
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# 58

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quote:
Originally posted by Ferijen:
quote:
Originally posted by LydaRose:
Remind me never to try to order a sandwich in the UK. [Eek!]

Would that be a butty or a sarnie?
And do you want it in a bap, roll, ciabatta, baguette, pitta, bagel, or just ordinary bread, or toasted panini? Brown, white or granary? With butter or mayonnaise or both or neither? And which filling would you like? Hot or cold? Double? Mixed? Salads? Salt and pepper? Lemon juice? Other seasonings? Pickles? Sauces?

I tell you, if you're feeling indecisive don't ever go into a sandwich bar.

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Crotalus
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# 4959

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quote:
Originally posted by Gremlin:
Isn't that just a little ironic given the French nickname for the British, Le Rost Bif

Rather dated, I believe; the current expression is les fuckoffs
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chukovsky

Ship's toddler
# 116

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quote:
Originally posted by Ferijen:
quote:
Originally posted by LydaRose:
Remind me never to try to order a sandwich in the UK. [Eek!]

Would that be a butty or a sarnie?
Or a piece? (scroll down)

[ 15. July 2004, 09:51: Message edited by: chukovsky ]

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chukovsky

Ship's toddler
# 116

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The Piece Song.

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Eigon
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# 4917

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Crotalus - in the Middle Ages, the French called the English the "Goddamms" - so I suppose "les fuckoffs" is just reverting to ancient usage.

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R.A.M.
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# 7390

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Gah...

I was on holiday for a week and in that time someone insults Bradford (can't remeber who it took me ages to get through it all and eat second breakfast) deary deary me, even worse noone defended my birthplace.
Other than Bradford MDC of course which not even hard line lancs can deny has its charms. But what about the city itself, not as souless as Leeds or as grubby as London, more navigable than Manchester (though manchester is fairly easy) and more curry than India. (per head more indian food outlets than any sity on the subcontinent)
Bradford curry is a decidedly inner city thing not a thing from the toursit traps and is also world renowned - i recommend anyone in britain especially in lancaster to pop too the coop and seek out a Mumtaz curry. Ahh well I missed the big county war so I shan't make to many comparisons back to the weirdness of britain.

The weirdness of Bradford is that anywhere south of scotland and not yorkshire is south, lancastrians are as much bloody southeners as londoners I have even heard the residents of barnsley dexcribed as southern softies.

On another note i was recently exporting the weirdness of Britain to Prague - and the Americans we met there, the locals now think we are all mad - and incapable - however hard I tried I couldn't pronounce Narodni Trida (insert acents including other the r to make it a sort of r/g/z sound). The americans think we are all 'cool' which is interesting i wonder if this is a commenly held opinion - cool britania sort of thing??

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Back after prolonged absence...

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chukovsky

Ship's toddler
# 116

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quote:
Originally posted by Real Ale Methodist:
i recommend anyone in britain especially in lancaster to pop too the coop and seek out a Mumtaz curry.

The Sultan of Lancaster, Northwest Curry Chef of the Year, not good enough for you?

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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quote:
Originally posted by Amorya:
Y'what? A cob isn't loaf sized! When I go to buy a "filled cob" I expect a sandwhich, not a whole bloody picnic!

Just because the bakers are all stingy where you are, no need to take it out on the rest of us!

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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quote:
Originally posted by Schroedinger's cat:
I've never heard of a barm-cake or Stotty either. And I agree with Amorya that cob is roll-sized ( although possibly large roll sized ). Not loaf sized.

Baps would generally besmaller, but still sandwich sized. However the terms could be interchanged.

A roll would usually be smaller still, more a nibble than a sandwich.

I think we are agreeing loudly here. Cobs are bigger than baps which are larger-than-average than rolls.

Cobs are rounded though, while baps (& stotties - which are purely found in "the land where the Tyne, Wear and Tees meet the North rolling Sea") are flattened.

Also a cob can be crusty. Baps tend to be soft.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

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Jonah the Whale

Ship's pet cetacean
# 1244

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quote:
Originally posted by Real Ale Methodist:
Bradford curry is a decidedly inner city thing not a thing from the toursit traps and is also world renowned - i recommend anyone in britain especially in lancaster to pop too the coop and seek out a Mumtaz curry.

My brother lives in Bradford, and is a big curry fan. But when he was over visiting he tasted some curry that we made from curry paste bought in our local supermarket (toss in your own meat and veg type thing). He was so impressed that he decided to take some back to England with him. We did a quick trip to the shop and picked up their remaining packets. After buying them he noticed, in small letters, the words "Made in Lancashire".
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Rat
Ship's Rat
# 3373

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Well, I'm another one who's never heard of barm-cakes or stotties, and I reckon you lot are making things up now. I think I've heard of baps, but never to my knowledge eaten one.

I did bake potato bread (tattie scones) once but, like many of my more ambitious baking experiments, it went horribly wrong. I blame the oven.

(Mmm, memories of potato bread and soda bread fried in the fat from the bacon have just overwhelmed me.)

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It's a matter of food and available blood. If motherhood is sacred, put your money where your mouth is. Only then can you expect the coming down to the wrecked & shimmering earth of that miracle you sing about. [Margaret Atwood]

Posts: 5285 | From: A dour region for dour folk | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Ariel
Shipmate
# 58

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A roll is roll sized. Some are slightly smaller than others. There are also torpedo rolls and submarine rolls and so on but when it comes to the round ones, morning rolls are smallest.

A bap is large. Bigger than a burger bun, flat and soft. In some sandwich shops their baps are huge and look about 6" across. I think baps seem to be a relatively recent thing, I don't remember them much before the 90s. (Ciabatta and a bunch of other things hit the market around the same time.)

A cob as far as I know is a loaf - or a Kentish nut. I've never seen them at sandwich shops.

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Alicïa
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# 7668

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quote:
Originally posted by Real Ale Methodist:

On another note i was recently exporting the weirdness of Britain to Prague - and the Americans we met there, the locals now think we are all mad - and incapable - however hard I tried I couldn't pronounce Narodni Trida (insert acents including other the r to make it a sort of r/g/z sound). The americans think we are all 'cool' which is interesting i wonder if this is a commenly held opinion - cool britania sort of thing??

I bet the whole world thinks we're mad [Biased] barm cake eating vegetarian rosbeefs peacenik warmongers still fighting Hastings/ the Roses we collectively do seem mad thats for sure,

[Razz]
ps what would I do for a Chip Barm with Salad Cream right now. Darn that diet, all this talk of Barms / Baps is making me hungry.

Imagine Jesus "I am the bread of life,"

and Simon Peter goes " but which one Jesus, BarmCake,Bap or Cob?"

[Big Grin]

Posts: 884 | From: Where the Art is. | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Amorya

Ship's tame galoot
# 2652

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quote:
Originally posted by chukovsky:
I grew up in Warwickshire and went to school in Coven-tray and never, ever heard "barm-cake", Amorya. It is some of those North Warks/Derbyshire types pulling your leg I think. It is a bap or a roll.

Naah - it's written on the menu in all the various sandwich shops and chip shops round here. Pretty elaborate joke if it's all to fool me [Smile]

Amorya

Posts: 2383 | From: Coventry | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Amorya

Ship's tame galoot
# 2652

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Oh, just to add another to the "name a roll" debate... at college you'd ask for a "chip batch" if you wanted your chips in a bread roll type thing.

Never seen anywhere else use that name though.


Amorya

Posts: 2383 | From: Coventry | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
ken
Ship's Roundhead
# 2460

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"batch roll" is quite a well known name. Maybe that's where "chip batch" came from.

Batch rolls or batch loaves are made in a tray instead of individual tins & so have to be separated later. And have little marks on the side where they were stuck to their neighbouring bread product.

& while we're at it "barm" the froth on brewing beer, the meaning later extened to a yeast culture tkane from brewing beer. So a "barm" cake is a yeast cake - i.e. leavened bread - made with a beer culture.

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Ken

L’amor che move il sole e l’altre stelle.

Posts: 39579 | From: London | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
chukovsky

Ship's toddler
# 116

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Ken - or just "batches", as in "floury batch".

Amorya, I still maintain I have never seen a sandwich shop in Cov selling a barm-cake. Perhaps you have happened across the one shop owned and operated by someone who talks Lanky? Or was it Greggs? I think they're Northern.

This list suggests it is north-western use. And at De Montfort they warn unsuspecting southerners to watch out for cobs.

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This space left intentionally blank. Do not write on both sides of the paper at once.

Posts: 6842 | From: somewhere else | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sioni Sais
Shipmate
# 5713

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I first heard about barm cakes from someone from Cheadle who had lived in that area of NE Cheshire (Stockport, Poynton, that area).

I don't know how general the term is though because my mum didn't use it and she was from Bury, just a bit further to the north of Manchester. Some of these things are very local indeed - a Local Word for Local People.

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

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Alaric the Goth
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# 511

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quote:
Originally posted by Sioni Sais:
I first heard about barm cakes from someone from Cheadle who had lived in that area of NE Cheshire (Stockport, Poynton, that area).

I don't know how general the term is though because my mum didn't use it and she was from Bury, just a bit further to the north of Manchester. Some of these things are very local indeed - a Local Word for Local People.

They definitely use the term as far north as Leigh, and I think Bolton, so it must be quite close to Bury where it stops being used.
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Eigon
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# 4917

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However, I lived just outside Bury as a kid, in Whitefield, and we said barm cakes.

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Laugh hard. Run fast. Be kind.

Posts: 3710 | From: Hay-on-Wye, town of books | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
Sioni Sais
Shipmate
# 5713

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But Bolton's six miles from Bury! Almost a continental divide.

Then again my mum could have been coming on posh again. Some of her family were a bit "Fur coat, no knickers" (to use a fine local phrase).

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"He isn't Doctor Who, he's The Doctor"

(Paul Sinha, BBC)

Posts: 24276 | From: Newport, Wales | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Jonah the Whale

Ship's pet cetacean
# 1244

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quote:
Originally posted by Alaric the Goth:
They definitely use the term as far north as Leigh, and I think Bolton, so it must be quite close to Bury where it stops being used.

They use it further north still. I grew up in Clitheroe and it was not unusual there. Though I never did suss out what the difference was between baps, barm cakes and teacakes (no, not the things with currants in, they are properly known as currant teacakes).
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Crotalus
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# 4959

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Whilst in many parts of the United Kingdom a butty is a sandwich, where Sioni Sais lives it is a friend. Strange, yes?
Posts: 713 | From: near the knacker's yard | Registered: Sep 2003  |  IP: Logged



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