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» Ship of Fools   » Special interest discussion   » Ecclesiantics   » Sundry liturgical questions (Page 36)

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Source: (consider it) Thread: Sundry liturgical questions
Ceremoniar
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# 13596

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quote:
Originally posted by Ceremoniar:
quote:
Originally posted by georgiaboy:
YMMV, of course, but in more than 50 years as an Anglican communicant, and in many parishes and cathedrals both here in the USA and the UK, I have NEVER seen this:

'Carrying a book or service paper to indicate a blessing, is another of those 'Anglican' practices.'

Though I am sure that it is done in some places. Anglicans, in my experience, remain surprisingly 'insular' (sorry about the incipient pun) and tend to assume that what is done in one's home parish is universal practice.


In a friend's Episcopal parish in the southern US, this is the practice. I had not heard of it until she told me about it ten years ago.
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keibat
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georgiaboy wrote:
quote:
'Carrying a book or service paper to indicate a blessing, is another of those 'Anglican' practices.'
and various Shipmates have responded with varying degrees of confirmation and dismissal. Having lived for many years as an Anglican in a Nordic Lutheran environment, I was used to their convention of putting a hand on the opposite shoulder to request a blessing rather than communion. It works well: it's very clear, and doesn't depend on having had one's wits about one to pick up the service booklet and take it with. On relocating to England a few years ago, I then encountered the booklet practice, and can confirm that it is today used in many C-of-E churches.
On the other hand, it was in the Anglican Diocese in Europe, where congregations characteristically attract a rather ecumenical gathering of worshipers from many different Christian traditions, that I became familiar with the practice of explicitly stating, often both in print in the service booklet and also spoken, that "All baptized Christians are welcome to receive communion", sometimes with the tactful addition: "subject to their discretion" or something similar. In my own experience it was usually only the Orthodox who would systematically refrain.

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keibat from the finnish north and the lincs east rim

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Galilit
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And the Dutch Reformed.

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She who does Her Son's will in all things can rely on me to do Hers.

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georgiaboy
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I've not seen this addressed here before. If it has been, my apologies.

I have observed many (not all) Hispanic and some Anglo RCs and Anglicans who, when making the sign of the cross, finish by kissing their right thumb. I've not asked any of them about this, because it would seem sort of a personal question, but I've wondered.

Any explanation(s), ideas?

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You can't retire from a calling.

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Oblatus
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quote:
Originally posted by georgiaboy:
I have observed many (not all) Hispanic and some Anglo RCs and Anglicans who, when making the sign of the cross, finish by kissing their right thumb. I've not asked any of them about this, because it would seem sort of a personal question, but I've wondered.

I think they're forming a cross with their thumb and forefinger, so they're kissing the Cross.

Someone called Ken on a Roman Catholic forum I found explained it:

My wife who is from the Philippines does this. It is because they make a cross with their thumb and index finger and make the sign of the cross with their thumb and index finger crossed, like a cross. After touching their right shoulder they then kiss the "cross" made by their thumb and forefinger. This is the identical practice when praying the rosary and making the sign of the cross with the crucifix and then kissing the crucifix.

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american piskie
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quote:
Originally posted by Oblatus:
quote:
Originally posted by georgiaboy:
I have observed many (not all) Hispanic and some Anglo RCs and Anglicans who, when making the sign of the cross, finish by kissing their right thumb. I've not asked any of them about this, because it would seem sort of a personal question, but I've wondered.

I think they're forming a cross with their thumb and forefinger, so they're kissing the Cross.

Someone called Ken on a Roman Catholic forum I found explained it:

My wife who is from the Philippines does this. It is because they make a cross with their thumb and index finger and make the sign of the cross with their thumb and index finger crossed, like a cross. After touching their right shoulder they then kiss the "cross" made by their thumb and forefinger. This is the identical practice when praying the rosary and making the sign of the cross with the crucifix and then kissing the crucifix.

Oh thanks, now I know what I'm doing.
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georgiaboy
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quote:
Originally posted by Oblatus:
quote:
Originally posted by georgiaboy:
I have observed many (not all) Hispanic and some Anglo RCs and Anglicans who, when making the sign of the cross, finish by kissing their right thumb. I've not asked any of them about this, because it would seem sort of a personal question, but I've wondered.

I think they're forming a cross with their thumb and forefinger, so they're kissing the Cross.

Someone called Ken on a Roman Catholic forum I found explained it:

My wife who is from the Philippines does this. It is because they make a cross with their thumb and index finger and make the sign of the cross with their thumb and index finger crossed, like a cross. After touching their right shoulder they then kiss the "cross" made by their thumb and forefinger. This is the identical practice when praying the rosary and making the sign of the cross with the crucifix and then kissing the crucifix.

Thanks. I had some vague memory that it was somehow related to Rosary devotions.

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You can't retire from a calling.

Posts: 1646 | From: saint meinrad, IN | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged



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